Renewables, Solar, Solar

Powering up for GWMWater’s Nhill solar farm construction

GWMWater

The first phase of construction at GWMWater’s Nhill Renewable Energy Facility is set to kick off in May 2024.

According to GWMWater, this marks a significant step in Nhill’s journey towards renewable energy, with the company awarding the contract for the works to Next Generation Electrical.

This facility represents GWMWater’s first attempt into large-scale energy generation, with a direct connection to the local electricity grid.

Once fully operational, the facility is expected to offset 70 per cent of GWMWater’s total electricity use across its 330 pump stations, treatment facilities, offices, and depots.

GWMWater managing director Mark Williams expressed his excitement about the project.

“This is a major and exciting step forward for GWMWater, working towards becoming a carbon-neutral net-generator of electricity,” he said.

According to Williams, Nhill Renewable Energy Facility will form a crucial part of the organisation’s broader clean energy strategy.

The facility is a joint venture between GWMWater and South Australia-based energy infrastructure company, Vibe Energy. It is anticipated to be operational from early next year.

The facility will boast a 2.75 megawatts (MW), or 6.7 megawatt/hours (MWh) battery and will generate 6.5 MW of solar energy from its more than 9000 solar panels. This is equivalent to about 1000 residential rooftop systems.

The Nhill facility, in conjunction with solar generation installed at 59 other GWMWater sites, will enable GWMWater to become more self-sufficient by generating the energy needed to operate its services with less reliance on electricity from the grid.

This initiative aligns with GWMWater’s goals of sourcing 100 per cent renewable electricity by 2025 and achieving net-zero emissions by 2035.

The investment in renewable energy will allow GWMWater to continue delivering essential water and sewer services without passing on the cost of rising energy costs to customers.

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